Tides in Songs

Tides in songs

There are a few obvious ones – we might post them at some point.

Given the great number of folk (and other) songs about the sea, and particularly ones about separated lovers due to men (most often) going to sea/lost at sea, tides feature in some.


The high tide,  being a moment of departure, and (possible)  return, becomes a moment of emotional climax.

This is a classic traditional English folk song in such a vain

Just as the Tide Was Flowing

One morning in the month of May,
When all the birds were singing,
I saw a lovely lady stray,
Across the fields at break of day,
And softly sang her roundelay:

“The tide flows in, the tide flows out,
Twice every day returning.”

“A sailor’s wife at home must bide.”
She halted heavily, she sighed,
“He parted from poor me, me a bride,
Just as the tide was a-flowing.”

“The tide flows in, the tide flows out,
Twice every day returning.”

Here is a recording of this song (words slightly different) by  the now celebrated English folk singer Shirley Collins singing this song (There are many other versions).


This is Sweet Thames Flows Softly by Ewan MacColl sung bu Rufus and Martha Wainright. Its rather wonderful in its use of the places on the river as way-stations of love and then the turn of the tide and the fog on the river for love recceding

 


Although not about the tide per se Moon of   Björk’s  Biophilia album (2011) which was a large transmedia creation with apps, lives shows and related films speaks of the cycles of the moon and their eco-socio-cultural significance

Here is Moon from the album

Lyrics (as found on the web)

Moon 

As the lukewarm hands of the Gods
Came down and gently picked my adrenaline pearls
They placed them in their mouths
And rinsed all of the fear out
Nourished them with their saliva

Oh rested, as if the healthiest past time
Is being in life threatening circumstances
And once again be reborn

(All birthed and happy)
All birthed and happy
(All birthed and happy)
All birthed and happy
(All birthed and happy)

Best way to start the new is to fail miserably
Fail at loving and fail at giving
Fail at creating a flow then realign the whole
And kick into the start hole

And kick into the start hole
And kick into the start hole

To risk all is the end all and the beginning all
To risk all is the end all and the beginning all

From Wikipedia – “about the song, Björk explained: “With each new moon we complete a cycle and are offered renewal —to take risks, to connect with other people, to love, to give. The symbolism of the moon as the realm of imagination, melancholy, and regeneration is expressed in the song”

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